War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0177 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

The Augusta, Savannah, General Hooker, navy tug Daffodil, and three launches are here all out of coal. We have had no trouble on the river expect the steam launch being fired on by musketry.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. C. NEIL,

U. S. Navy, Chief of Armed Transports, Dept. of the South,

Commanding Army Forces in Santee River, S. C.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Heard, S. C., April 11, 1865.

Bvt. Major General C. GROVER,

Commanding District of Savannah:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs me to say that the Nellie Baker is sent to bring yourself and guests to the flag raising at Sumter and to the staff ball at these headquarters to-morrow (Wednesday) night. There is a seagoing steamer just in from the North, too large to enter savannah, which will be at your service for the Charleston trip, so that the Baker can make two trips as far as this place, if necessary, and all will be accommodated.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. D. HODGES,

Captain, 35th U. S. Colored Troops, and Actg. Asst. Adjt. General

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Smithfield, N. C., April 12, 1865 - 5 a. m.

(Received 2. 20 p. m. 14th.)

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

Commanding Armies of the United States, Virginia:

GENERAL: I have this moment received your telegram announcing the surrender of Lee's army. I hardly know how to express my feelings, but you can imagine them. The terms you have given Lee are magnanimous and liberal. Should Johnston follow Lee's example I shall of course grant the same. He is retreating before me on Raleigh, but I shall be there to-morrow. Roads are heavy, but under the inspiration of the news from you we can march twenty-five miles a day. I am now twenty-seven miles from Raleigh, but some of my army is eight miles befind. If Johnston retreats south I will follw him to insure the scattering of his force and capture of the locomotives and cars at Charlotte; but I take it he will surrender at Raleigh. Kilpatrick's cavalry is ten miles to the south and west of me, viz, on Middle Creek, and I have sent Major Audenried with orders to make for the south and west of Raleigh to impede the enemy if he goes beyond Raleigh. All the infantry is pointed straight for Raleigh by five different roads. The railroad is being repaired from Goldsborough to Raleigh, but I will not aim co carry it farther. I shall expect to hear from General Sheridan in case Johnston does not surrender at Raleigh. With a little more cavalry I would be sure to capture the whole army.

Yours, truly,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

[Indorsement.]

Have this telegraphed to Sheridan.

U. S. G.

12 R R-VOL XLVII, PT III