War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0148 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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KINSTON, N. C., April 9, 1865.

Brevet Major-General BIRGE,

New Berne:

I have telegraphed to General Schofield, but can get no reply. I cannot let these two regiments go without an order from him.

E. HARLAND,

Brigadier-General.

KINSTON, N. C., April 9, 1865.

Brigadier General H. W. BIRGE,

New Berne, N. C.:

As it is impossible for the One hundred and twenty-eighth and One hundred and seventy-fifth Regiments New York Volunteers to proceed to Goldsborough on this morning's train (it having already arrived), shall they be ordered to proceed then by the next train; and if so, who shall they be directed to report to on their arrival there?

E. HARLAND,

Brigadier-General.

KINSTON, N. C., April 9, 1865.

Brevet Major-General BIRGE,

New Berne:

I have heard from General Schofield. I will order the One hundred and twenty-eighth and the One hundred and seventy-fifth to be ready.

E. HARLAND,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., April 9, 1865.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN,

Commanding Mil. Div. of the Miss., Goldsborough, N. C.:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 6th, by the hands of Lieutenant Snow, was received last night about 12 o'clock, containing the glorious news of the capture of Richmond and Petersburg, and the full retreat of Lee's army. I most heartily congratulate both yourself and the lieutenant-general on the prospect of having, atan early day, the great insurgent army where you can hope to be able to put the finishing blow to its career. With regard to affairs in this quarter, I am most anxious to carry out all your plans, and have no reason to doubt that I shall be able to do so. Indeed, nothing but the most explicit orders could have forced me to remain quiet, seeing as I did an opportunity to accomplish so much with trifling expenditure of means. Such orders, however, I did receive from the headquarters of the army, and they were not only given in very plain terms, but were reiterated. What I wanted and but I could not get them. With such a force, if I had it now, I could reach any point in South Carolina and Georgia within 130 milesof the coast, keeping the entire railroad system in these parts in a useless condition. It starting was delayed some days by a number of coincident causes; but I gave Brigadier-General Potter, its commander, his final instructions on the 4th instant at Georgetown, and he expected to start