War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0115 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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WILMINGTON, April 6, 1865-11. 25 a. m.

Major-General TERRY,

Faison's Station:

Glory to God. Please give us what details you have. General Schofield stopped my sending troops up last night, as I telegraphed you this morning. I am very reliable informed that Hampton's cavalry is at Elizabeth. Citizens say it is all there, or near by, numbering about 2,000, with four pieces of artillery. Two of hismen have been here as spies.

J. R. HAWLEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

WILMINGTON, N. C., April 6, 1865-7. 28 p. m.

Major-General TERRY,

Faison's Station:

I have 1,401 rifles present for duty; 626 are on daily or permanent guard and outpost duties; 400 sent up, according to your last dispatch, leaves 375 nominally to spare, most of whom are convalescents. Colonel Atwell has started.

J. R. HAWLEY,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WILMINGTON,

Wilmington, N. C., April 6, 1865.

Mr. D. HEATON,

Supervising Special Agent Treasury Department, &c.:

SIR: It is my duty to notify you that under the orders just receive from department headquarters no further shipment of cotton or other captured property can be permitted. In connection with Brevet Brigadier-General Hayes you will cause the cotton already on a shcooner at the dock to be unloaded. I sent you a copy of the immediate order under which I am acting. My orders are to forward all captured property through the quartermaster's department, subject to the orders of the department commander.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. R. HAWLEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Goldsborough, N. C., April 6, 1865.

(Received 12 midnight 8th.)

Major General Q. A. GILLMORE,

Commanding Department of the South, Charleston:

GENERAL: I wrote you very fully from Fayetteville, since which time I have joined my own immediate army with those of Terry and Schofield, and now have at this point a splendid base with roads finished back to New Berne and Wilmington. I have also been up to see General Grant, and am ready now to march again. It is all important that the work I did in South Carolina be kept unrepaired, and more especially that the locomotives and cars penned up about Sumterville and Florence be either destroyed or brought in. I believe that Johnston has brought up to Raleigh every man that can be brought out of South Carolina and Georgia, therefore now is the time to do the work.