War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0107 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

Goldsborough, N. C., April 5, 1865-9. 20 p. m.

Brigadier General J. R. HAWLEY,

Wilmington:

You can defer sending troops above Northeast until Friday or Saturday. One hundred men will be enough at Northeast. You might weaken your garrisons at Forts Fisher and Caswell for a short time until Order Numbers 20 is carried out. The cannot be in any danger for some time. Order Numbers 20 has been sent you, but another copy will be sent to-morrow.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WILMINGTON,

Wilmington, N. C., April 5, 1865.

Bvt. Brigadier General J. C. ABBOTT,

Commanding Post of Wilmington:

SIR: The brigadier-general commanding directs that you detail a regiment or regiments, sufficient to furnish 500 men, for duty in guarding the railroad between Northeast and Magnolia. They will move in light marching order, with three days' cooked rations, and will afterward supply themselves by the aid of the railroad from Northeast or Magnolia. They will be absent from five to eight days. Let them take sixty rounds on their persons and at least twenty more in wagons. They should at least cross Northeast to-nightand be ready to relieve the other troops on the road by morning. Major Grant with his 100 at Northeast will fall under the same command. Let the senior officer report at these headquarters for instructions.

By order of Brigadier-General Hawley:

E. LEWIS MOORE,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Goldsborough, N. C., April 5, 1865.

Major General ROBERT ANDERSON,

Charleston, S. C.:

DEAR GENERAL: I see in the papers that an order has been made by the War Department that on the 14th instant you are to raise the same flag over Sumter which you were compelled to lower four years ago, and that I am supposed to be present. I will be there in thought but not in person, andI am glad that it falls to the lot of one so pure andnoble to represent our country in a drama so solemn, so majestic, doubt if we had fashioned events ourselves we could have produced a better conclusion. Four years of bitter war have tested our manhood, and dissipated the rude boastings of a class of menof which nothing but horrid war could have purged our country. But, alas! many of them have escpaed punishment as yet, and have involved thousands and millions of innocents. But the end is not yet. The brain that first conceived the thought must burst in anguish, the heart that pulsated with hellish joy must cease to beat, and the hand that pulled the first lanyard must be palsied before the wicked act that begun in Charleston on the 13th of April, 1861, is avenged. But "mine, not thine, is vengeance, saith the Lord," and we, poor sinners,