War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0051 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF NORTH CAROLINA, ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Goldsborough, N. C., March 28, 1865.

Brigadier General J. R. HAWLEY,

Commanding District of Wilmington:

GENERAL: Your report of the 20th of affairs in your district is very satisfactory, but there is one thing I do not quite understand, viz, the shipment of cotton by the Treasury agents. My orders, based upon one from Lieutenant-General Grant, directed that all contraband property captured about Wilmington be turned over to the quartermaster's department, to be held subject to my orders. The object was to propertly dispose of all property which became prize of war in the capture of Wilmington. Such property is not to be turned over to the Treasury Department, but is to be sent North to be disposed of as the Secretary of War may direct. I inlcose for your guidance a copy of General Grant's order on the subject. Please give me as soon as practicable a full report of all property seized and the disposition made of it. I have just learned from Colonel Hayes that he did not turn over to you my order on this subject, which accounts for the error, if one has been committed. I inclose a copy of that order also.

Very respectfully,

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WILMINGTON,

Wilmington, N. C., March 28, 1865.

Brigadier General S. VAN VLIET,

Chief Quartermaster, New York City:

SIR: I have the honor to forward herwith on the steamer General Sedgwick about 400 white refugees. They are a small portion of those accumulated by Major-General Sherman during his late march. When the general reached Fayetteville, finding the multitude impeding his march and eating all the food within reach, he turned the caravan toward Wilmington under guard. In his written instructions he said that he desired to have the white refugees sent to New York to the commissiners of immigration. Even if they are all to be fed by the Government, it can be done much cheaper there. Here they get but imperfect rations, which, with the exposure and crowding, threatens to bring pestilence. They impede and endanger military operaitns. Supplies cannot be gathered from the surrounding country. We have large numbers of the residents of this vicinity on our hands already.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. R. HAWLEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding, and Provost-Marshal-General.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, D. C., March 28, 1865.

Major General Q. A. GILLMORE,

Commanding Department of the South:

GENERAL: I inclose herewith a copy of General Orders, Numbers 50, War Department, March 27, in regard to replacing the old flag on Fort Sumter. * You will make the proper arrangements for carrying out the

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*See p. 34.

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