War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 1265 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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GURGAW, February 23, 1865.

Colonel CHILDS, Fayetteville:

General Bragg directs me to say, impossible for us, in present position, to know enemy's movements on Cape Fer. Enemy have little or no cavalry. Small mounted force pushed on front will, therefore, keep you informed. Have scouts well out, and obstruct river as much as possible. Place field battery in position to prevent passage of transports.

ARCHER ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CHARLOTTE, N. C., February 23, 1865.

Lieutenant-General HAMPTON,

Chesterville, S. C.:

Enemy's present movement will seriously endanger militia under General Garlington. Send him telegram of to-day (after reading it) addressed to your care.

G. T. BEAREGARD.

Important Appeal.

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION OF THE WEST,

Charlotte, N. C., February 23, 1865.

To delay the advance of the enemy until our troops can be massed in strength sufficient to crush them, I appeal to all good and patriotic citizens in the region of country threatened by the enemy to turn out in full force all available labor, with axes, spades, and mattocks, to destroy and obstruct roads leading toward Charlotte from the south, commencing first along the roads leading to Landsford, and other crossings between that point and the railroad bridge, obstructing at the same time all roads parallel to the river within the following limits: The Pleasant Valley road, on the east, to a point opposite Landsford; thence across the Catawba to Fishing Creek; thence up said creek to the Charlotte and South Carolina Railroad. After the work should be continued farther up the river, should the enemy threaten an advance in that direction. The negroes should be assembled at the following pointz, viz, Charlotte, Pleasant Valley, Belair, Landsford, Fort Mills, and Rock Hill, under the direction of their owners, each with six days' provisions, cooking utensils, and blankets. As far as possible the negroes will be employed at points not distant from their homes. They will be protected by guards, and assisted by the home guards of the State. An engineer officer will be at each of the points of rendezvous to give proper direction to the labor of all who will now join us in the struggle to stay and destroy the ruthless invaders of our homes.

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General.

CHARLOTTE, February 23, 1865.

I earnestly appeal to the people of North Carolina to comply promptly with this request. I am satisfied they could render no greater service to their country.

Z. B. VANCE,

Governor of North Carolina.

80 R R - VOL XLVII, PT II