War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 1211 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE WEST,

Augusta, Ga., February 17, 1865.

Man. N. W. SMITH,

Inspector of Field Transportation:

MAJOR: I am instructed to say that General Beauregard does not approve of the contracts made by Major Bryan for the carriage of private freight in Government wagons between Mayfield and Midway. Independently of the consideration of its irregularity, it is improper and injudiciou, from the fact that, as our transportation is limited, it is necessary to preserve our teams, and they should not be worn out by hauling heavy private property. It not only exhausts thembut it retards the public business. Moreover, our sick and wounded furlughed men returning to their homes should be entitled to the benefit of such transportation. General Beauregard has, in view of these considerations, given orders that all private freight be in future thrown out of the Government wagons, and he requests that you will instruct Major Bryan to recall and annual the contracts made by him.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE WM. BRENT,

Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

CHARLESTON, February 17, 1865.

(Received 6. 20 19th.)

General S. COOPER:

General Hardee has been sick for some days and was sent off by his surgeon to-day. Major General L. McLaws, the next in rank, will be here to take command this evening.

T. B. ROY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE WEST,

Seven Miles from Columbia, on Rice's Creek Spring Road, February 17, 1865.

Lieutenant General W. HAMPTON,

Commanding Cavalry:

GENERAL: General Beauregard wishes you to inform General Stevenson that, in view of the danger of the enemy crossing Broad River above Wheeler's right, it is deemed best that Stevenson and his command should reach Cookham to-night, between Big Cedar and Little Cedar Crek, and his train the vicinity of Ridgeway, if possible. Cookham is about eighteen miles from Columbia; Ridgeway about twenty-five miles. The cavalry will necessarily follow its movements. Delay the enemy as much as possible. I will await at Killian's Station to hear from you. The general wishes you to keep him advised of the enemy's movements.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN M. OTEY,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.