War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 1207 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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force, is ordered to cover your movement. He will not reach Graniteville till night. Our information to-day by courier-line, no official, is that the Yankees occupy Lexington. You had better, then, march by Bauskett's Mill to Ridge Post-Office and halt there, if your information is such as to make it dangerous to go beyond. There is still a route open to Columbia from Ridge Post-Office by Germanville and Lee's Ferry on Saluda River.

Respectuflly, &c.,

D. H. HILL.

RICHMOND, VA., February 16, 1865.

General WADE HAMPTON,

Columbia, S. C.:

It gives me pleasure to inform you that the Senate yesterday confirmed my nomination of you to be lieutenant-general. As you were not advised of the nomination you may not have anticipated such action, but will understand it as an expression of my appreciation of your past services and confidence in your ability and future usefulness. You have my best wishes for your personally, and highest hopes of you officially.

JEFF'N DAVIS.

COLUMBIA, S. C., February 16, 1865-3 p. m.

Major General J. WHEELER,

Present:

I regret to hear the enemy has crossed the Saluda. Endeavor by all means to prevent him from crossing the Broad. Burnt the bridge should it become necessary. Send a messenger to Generals Cheatham and Hill to inform them of the present state of affairs.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

COLUMBIA, S. C., February 16, 1865.

Major JOHN G. STOKES,

Spotswood Hotel, Richmond, Va.:

Hampton will apply. Stay until you hear from the papers or from me. Eenemy in front of Columbia. Hope to hold it.

E. M. LAW,

Brigadier-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, Va., February 17, 1865.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Columbia, S. C.:

Two trains belonging to the State of Georgia have been impressed to remove stores from Charleston. Georgia has cotton on the road Return the trains to her agent unless they are employed for the removal of troops, ordnance, or other Confederate property of more importance than cotton, and return them as early as practicable in any event.

J. C. BRECKINRIDGE,

Secretary of War.