War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 1171 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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them. I examined, with General Wheeler, the Yankee position four miles below Aiken. I was not inclined to think that there was much force at that point. General Wheeler is confident that Twentieth Corps has near Windsor.

Respectfully,

D. H. HILL,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE WEST.

Columbia, S. C., February 12, 1865-10. 30 p. m.

Major General JOSEPH WHEELER,

Commanding Cavalry:

GENERAL: General Hardee asks for cavalry to guard his right flank, particularly so much as extends for cavalry to guard his right flank, General Beauregard directs that you move as soon as practicable, that the wishes of Lieutenant-General Hardee may be carried out.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN M. OTEY,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

Colonel BRENT: Please send to General Wheeler.

J. M. O.

(Sent from Augusta to General Wheeler, February 13, 1865, 1. 30 p. m.)

WILMINGTON, February 12, 1865.

Colonel H. FORNO,

Columbia:

No force can be spared from this department for the purpose indicated.

R. H. HOKE,

Major-General.

FEBRAURY 12, 1865.

Report of a scout.

I proceeded across the Salkehatchie River on the 1st of February, 1865, near the railroad bridge, and on reaching the river road at Blountville found the enemy in motion up the river. The column on this road camped on the night of the 1st about eleven miles north of Pocatoligo, and remained here until the morning of the 3rd; then they moved and I followed them near Broxton's Bridge, and then hearing drums to the west. I went off in that direction to the McPhersonville and Buford's Bridge road. On arriving at said road, about eighteen miles south of Buford's Bridge (near Richardson's and Bostwick's farms), I found that about 3,000 of the column advancing up this road filed to the right and joined the column at Broxton's Bridge. The remainder of this column camped on this road where the Sister's Ferry road runs into it, from the night of the 4th of the morning of the 7th, and then they proceeded on in the direction of the bridge. Here I turned back, came down the Pocatoligo road, met a supply train of wagons, with about 60 wagons and 200 guards, at or near Mrs. McBridge's farm.