War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 1119 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ERC. - CONFEDERATE.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

Wilmington, February 7, 1865.

Major General R. F. HOKE,

Commanding Division, Sugar Loaf:

GENERAL: I have the instruction of the commanding general to communicate his views to you as follows: The enemy's reconnoitering and maranding parties on the west side of the river should be captured or prevented from coming out at all. Our cavalry is not pushed forward as close to their lines as it should be. The recent capture of prisoners in our front by signal officer points to want of vigor in that arm. Detachments ought not to land with impunity, as they have just done at Battery Lamb. It would seem practicable to greatly annoy, if not capture, the very small garrison at Smithville. Even this effort would enliven our troops, now statnating and despondent for want of activity. LSupplies in the country and telegraph wire close to the Federal lines should be brought out and our people prevanted from trading or communicating with the enemy. Such measures would also prevent desertions to the enemy by closing the evenues of approach and stop the recruiting of the U. S. forces from runaway negroes, which is going on to considerable extent.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ARCHER ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SUGAR LOAF, February 7, 1865.

Colonel ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Have you received information from General Hagood of the enemy landing troops to-day? Nothing of the kind could be seen from this side.

R. F. HOKE.

Major-General.

FORT ANDERSON, february 7, 1865.

Colonel ANDERSON:

Signal operator reports enemy landing troops at Buchanan from transports in the inlet and outside, brought to Buchanan in tugs. They had guns, kanpsacks, &c. ; wagons hauling up baggage. They were discovered when fog lifted at 12 o'clock. The operator saw, he thinks, 1. 200 landed after 12 o'clock. These marched through Fisher to Camp Wyatt. A considerable number of tents also appeared at Camp Wyatt this morning that were not there yesterday; this before the 1. 200 marched up.

JOHNSON HAGOOD,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

Wilmington, February 7, 1865.

Colonel GEORRGE JACKSON,

Commanding Post:

COLONEL: The commanding general directs that you take immediate measures to remove every bale of cotton stored in Wilmington as fast