War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 1113 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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AUGUSTA, GA., February 7, 1865.

Brig, General A. W. REYNOLDS:

GENERAL: The men you sent down have all run off. Mr. Glenn promised that a company should be formed from them for Dearing's battery, but we have proof that he made them a speech, telling them that they were going to be taken from thim, and advising them to run off. This they did, after selling all the public property they had in camp. I hope that you will take prompt action in the case. I sent you and order yesterday from General Beauregard to send 500 men as a guard to the stores at Washington, Ga., to report to Colonel Rudler, commanding post.

D. H. HILL.

Major-General.

AUGUSTA, GA., February 7, 1865-11 a. m.

Colonel CUMMING:

COLONEL: I can't find out wherher any of the Western troops have gone out to you or not. Please let me know. If Captain Lumpkin is with your command put him in position. The two 3-inch rifles have come up for him and he can get them at any time. The Yankees got on the railroad last night. Two brigades of Wheeler's command are between them and Augusta. Make your arrangements for defense and vigilance as though they were not there.

Respectfully,

D. H. HILL,

Major-General.

CHARLESTON, S. C., February 7, 1865.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD:

If your health will permit, I consider it of great importance that you should come here at once.

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

CHARLESTON, February 7, 1865.

Major-General WHEELER:

Send at least 500 additional cavalry across the Edisto. Let one regiment report to Major-General Stevenson.

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

AUGUSTA, February 7, 1865-11 a. m.

Colonel C. C. CREWS,

Commanding, &c.:

COLONEL: Your dispatch of last night, 11 p. m. received. You will keep up communicatgion on your left, by pickets and scouts, with General Wheeler and communicate with him He telegraphs that he had sent another bruagade to your support. You somewhat misonderstood my note. It was meant simply to apprise you of the state of things on the railroad, and of what was required of you in case of and advance upon Augusta. It was not intended that you should abandon the line