War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 1110 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF GEORGIA,

February 6, 1865.

General IVERSON:

GENERAL: I send you and order of General Beauregard with indorsement so full as to preclude the necessity of details in a letter. I leave it to your judgment whether to withdraw Colonel Hawkins or not. You ought to cvoncentrate everything for a fight. Wheeler had held the railroad up to 5 o'clock thi morning, but thought that he would lose it to-day. We are concerned to know whether the Twenty-third Corps is at or near Savannah, and whether Kilpatrick has crossed.

Respectfully,

D. H. HILL,

Major-General,

RICHMOND, February 6, 1865.

(Received 7th.)

General BRAGG,

Wilmington:

Constructor Porter can complete the new vessel in ninety days. Machinery is ready at Columbus to suit. I do not wish to move it without reliable assurance that Wilmington will be held long enough [to complete] the work. Before ordering it on, therefore, please advise me chances of our holding Wilmington.

S. R. MALLORY,

Secretary of the Navy.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

Wilmington, February 6, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. TAYLOR,

Asst. Adjt. General, Hdqrs. Army of Northern Virginia:

COLONEL: I inclose a copy of a communication* from General Baker relative to movements of the enemy at Morehead City and New Berne. From other reports I am satisfied some important operation is on foot in that quarter.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BRAXTON BRAGG,

General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

Wilmington, February 6, 1865.

Major General J. F. GULMER,

Chief Engineer, Richmond:

GENERAL: I have your confidential letter in regard to the Wilmington and Rutherford Railroad. Immediately on its receipt I took measures to inform myself in regard to its importance, public and private, as well as its availability. I find a large proportion of the supplies, probably one-half, used by the troops in this region, is drawn from the country bordering this road, and a still larger proportion of the subsisttence for the citizens reaches tthem by this route. But this is not the main consideretion inducing me to defer action on your suggesttions. The road, though not absolutely owned by, is mortgaged to, the LState of North Carolina, and any attempt to seize it under the impress