War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 1095 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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bridge, forcing him back toward Branchville. Should you have received no definite orders from General Hardee for the present contingency, you will cross the Salkehatchie with the bulk of your forces as close to Rivers' Bridge as safety practicable, and re-establish your communications with General McLaws (or Stevenson) at or about Branchville, protecting at the same time the Charleston railroad from that point toward Blackville, and beyond if possible. When complled to fall back from the railroad, you will defend the crossings of the Edisto above Branchville, operating in conjunction with General Stevenson for the protection of Columbia and the crossings of the Congaree above and below that city. The remainder of your force (day about one birgade) left south of the Salkehatchie, will retire, fightinf, in the direction of Augusta, holding the enemy in check wherever practicable. It will be sent keep General Hill advised of your movements and of those of the enemy.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General.

NEAR MORRIS' FORD,

February 4, 1865.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD, Augusta:

Information from scouts is that the enemy are still moving toward Buford's Bridge. I go immediately to Buford's Bridge and midway road.

J. WHEELER.

Send above also to Lieutenant General W. J. Hardee at Branchville.

J. WHEELER.

Major-General.

MIDWAY, February 4, 1865.

Major-General WHEELER:

I shall not destroy Cannon's Brdge or any of the bridges above it on the Edisto. I leave them for you to retreat upon and destroy.

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

(Operator Blackville will forward this to General Wheeler.)

BRANCHVILLE, February 4, 1865.

Major-General WHEELER:

Binnaker's Bridge had probably been destroyed by Captain Kanapaux. I now will ascertain whether this is so. This bridge is above Cannon's. If it has not been destroyed you will coures destroy it when you retreat across it.

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

BRANCHVILLE, February 4, 1865-7 p. m.

Major-General WHEELER:

I go to Charleston to-night. Keep me fully advised of the movements of the enemy. I have said the railroad could be kept open all