War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 1083 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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RICHMOND, February 2, 1865.

General BRAXTON BRAGG:

President is fully disposed to do all you wish, but says you must name your two aides. Has difficutly about rank of aides and any adjutant-general's commission to Strange and Cuthbert, who parted with no position [sic]. Your presence would save all and do other good. Presidnet thinks you should come. I propose to leave your office books and papers with him. He concurs. If fleet has left, foo ask orders to come. I know the necessity, or would not be importunate.

JOHN B. SALE,

Military Secretary.

RICHMOND, Ferbruary 2, 1865.

General BRAXTON BRAGG:

Your presence said to be necessary here. Telegraph me at Petersgurg.

JAMES E. CUTHBERT,

Major and Aide-de-Camp.

GENERAL ORDERS

HDQRS. DEPT. OF NORTH CAROLINA, Numbers 10.

Wilmigton, February 2, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel G. T. Gordon, Invalid Corps, is assigned to temporary duty as inspector-general of this department.

By order of General Bragg:

ARCHER ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

AUGUSTA, February 3, 1865.

His Excellency President DAVIS,

Richmond, V.:

Three points threatened by enemy are of greatest importance to hold at present: Charleston, Branchville, and Augusta. Sherman is now apparently moving on Branchville. If we had sufficient force to give him battle, a concentration of force should immediately take place there; but General Hardee reports only 13,700 effectives, infantry and artillery, of whom about 3,000 are State reserves and militia. Lee's corps just arrived here now on its way to Branchville, numbers only about 4,000 effectives. Cheatham's and Stewart's corps, averaging about 3,000 each, will not all arriver here before 10th instant, by which time enemy will probably have possession of Branchville. Concentration of Hardee's forces and mine cannot, therefore, take place south of Columbia. I respenctfully urge the vital importance of concentrating at Columbia such forces as can be sent from North Carolina and Virginia. Ten thousand or 12,000 additional men would insure the defeat of Sherman and the reopening of General Lee's communications with his base of supplies. I will repair to Columbiia as soon as practicable, and, with your approval, will assume command of all forces which may be assembled there. When railroad to Branchville shall have been tapped by enemy, General Lee's supplies will have to be sent via Washington, Ga., and Abbeville, S. C.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.