War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 1079 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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satisfied that he is one of our ablest and best generals. He has not been successful, but you can readily see that no general can be successful if he does not receive the support of the authorities above him.

I remain, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

J. LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS,

Near Lawtonville, February 2, 1865-12. 30 a. m.

General D. H. Hill,

Commanding District of Georgia:

GENERAL: The enemy moved up in very large force on both roads between the Coosawhatchie and Combashee Rivers. I have no doubt both Fiteenth and Seventeenth Corps are there; Kilpatrick is reported there also. There is certainly one large brigade of cavalry with this column. Scouts from rear report that nearly all the enemy have left Pocotaligo, moving north. I will go in person to the front of Fifteenth and Seventeenth Corps this morning. Enemy's movements now look as though Branchville, reather than Augusta, is their destination, though it is impossible yet to determine. General McLaws is at Broxton's Bridge. I fear the enemy may move up and attempt to cross at Buford's or Rivers' Brigades.

Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

J. WHEELER,

Major-General.

N. B. - The Twentieth Corps will be delayed by the roads being thoroughly blockaded; sufficient force will be left to retard it also.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS,

Fourteen Miles Northwest Hickory, February 2, 1865.

General D. H. HILL, Augusta, Ga.:

GENERAL: Your dispatch of 4. 15 p. m. 31st of January received. I think one corps is too much to send down to line of Brier Creek. The division you have sent there with Iverson's cavalry ought to be sufficient. If the rest of the troops you have were sent to the fortifications I have had built at Three Runs they would be in position to oppose an advance upon Augusta, or move aroung and oppose and advance upon the railroad at Blackville, Graham's, Midway, or Branchville. These troops would also then be in position to oppose an advance upon Columbia should it be made. If the enemy should advance upon Augusta on the Georgia side, these troops could be sent rapidly by railroad to Augusta, and then sent down to oppose him. If, after placing troops in position to hold the Three Runs, we should have any surplus troops, I think they should be sent to re-enforce our troops to prevent the enemy crossing at Broxton's, Rivers', and Buford's Bridges. The enemy drove us within seven miles of Allendale to-day, but they are now checked, and are skirmishing. They consist of botha infantry and cavalry.

Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

J. WHEELER,

Major-General.

[FEBRUARY 2, 1865. - For Wheeler to McLaws, reporting operations, see Part I, p. 1121.]