War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 1056 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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MONTGOMERY, ALA., January 29, 1865.

COMMANDING OFFICER AT MAYFIELD, GA.:

What is the cause of detention of troops at Mayfield? They must be hurried through.

GEORGE WM. BRENT,

Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

MONTGOMERY, ALA., January 29, 1865.

Colonel L. Von. ZINKEN,

Columbus, Ga.:

We leave in the morning.

GEORGE WM. BRENT,

Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

AUGUSTA, GA., January 29, 1865-2 p. m.

Lieutenant-General HARDEE,

Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: General Iverson wrote on Thursday that was about to withdraw from below Springield, that the Fourteenth Corps was before him. On Friday morning he wrote from Bick Creek, some thirty or forty miles in his rear. On Friday he continued his retreat and crossed Brier Creek. I have never known anything like it in my life. I has caused me great annoyance and embarrassment. The information from Iverson is absolutely nothing. I don't know whether there is any serious advance or not. If would to fatal to neglect these sensational reports and yet very vexatious to be deceived by them. There is something terribly wrong in our cavalry organization. They never think of delaying the Yankees by fighting them. The simple business is to get out of their way. Eighteen hundred men of Lee's corps are lookrd for to-day. Have been dalayed three days at Mayfield waiting for transportation. There is the greatest inefficincy or basest treachry in our railroad department. General Beauregard orders me to send you 3,000 men upon your requistion, if there be no advance upon Augusta. I think that the movement will be upon both sides of the river and that their supplies will come by river. I need and ordnance officer very much.

Respectfully,

D. H. HILL,

Major-General.

AUGUSTA, GA., January 29, 1865-1 p. m.

Major General G. W. SMITH,

Commanding Line of Brier Creek:

GENERAL: The last dispatch from Iverson, datech 4 p. m. 28th, reports all quiet. I have informed him that you were in command on Brier Creek. When you get in position below and have re-enforcements enoughh to hold the crossing I think that you had batter throw Iverson across the creek and push him down nearer the enemy. It is important to keep the telegraph line to Millen covered, as it is our only line. I