War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 1044 Chapter LIX. OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA.

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SALKEHATCHIE STATION, January 25, 1865.

Major-General WHEELER:

GENERAL: Lieutenant-General Hardee directs me to say that he desires you to keep yourself in communication with Major-General McLaws, who is now on the Combahee, with headquarters near the Salkehatchie railroad bridge, and if the enemy should cross at or near this point he wishes you to cross a portion of your cavalry. As soon as you can spare Colcock's cavalry you had better send it to report to General McLaws on this side of the river. If you think it advisable you can destroy the bridges above Broxton's Bridge as you retire.

Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

D. H. POOLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF GEORGIA,

January 25, 1865.

General J. WHEELER:

GENERAL: The burning of ties at Pocotaligo seems to indicate a change of base, either to the Augusta side of the river or to Wilmington. It is of the utmost importance to ascertain the truth of the reports of the scouts.

Very respectfully,

D. H. HILL,

Major-General.

JANUARY 25, 1865.

Major-General WHEELER:

GENERAL: It seems to me that the report of the scout in regard to the burning at Pocotaligo is of the utmost importance, and that no pains should be lost in verifying [it]. If the thing be so it means a change of base to this side of the river or to Wilmington.

Very respectfully,

D. H. HILL,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS,

Near Lawtonville, Januaryu 25, 1865 - 7. 25 p. m.

General L. McLAWS,

Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: Scouts from the Georgia side of Savannah River report the Fourteenth Army Corps is being encamped at Shaver's Swamp and as having sent scouts to Station Numbers 2 on Central Railroad. They state that loaded wagons were brought with them which were [unloaded and sent] back to Savannah for more. That the enemy say they intend moving forward as soon as the weather will permit. The boats reported day before yesterday as moving up the Savannah River are now said to be small ones, which were going for wood and provisions. They had gone as highh up as Grovenstein's Landing. General McCoy thinks the enemy are preparing to make a raid into Southwestern Georgia, though he gives no special evidences as to what his opinion is based on. Other scouts think that Kilpatrick is concentrating his cavalryu in Savannah, and citizens say the Yankees tell them they do not intend making any