War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 1000 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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reason to expect re-enforcements from Georgia other than Major General G. W. Smith's force of militia, now at Augusta, which is rapidly diminishing by desertion, and numbers less than 1,500 muskets. I have no information whatever from Hood, and have no reason to expect re-enforcements from that quarter. My effective force in Carolina, exclusive of Conner's brigade, is as follows: 3,500 regular infantry, 3,000 reserves, 1,100 militia, 3,100 heavy artillerists, 1,700 light artillery, and 6,100 cavalry.

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF S. CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND FLORIDA,

Charleston, S. C., January 8, 1865.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

Richmond, Va.:

Wheeler's cavalry has been reorganized under my direct supervision, and now consists of three divisions and eight brigades. It is a well organized and efficient body. The reports of its disorganization and demoralization are without foudnation, and the depredations ascribed to his command can generally be traced to bands of marauders claiming to belong to it. I know of nothing at present to add to its effectiveness except the promotion of Brigadier-General Allen to major-general, and of Colonel Dibrell to brigadier-general, for which recommendations have been sent on.

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

CHARLESTON, January 8, 1865.

General S. COOPER:

General D. H. Hill has probably already reported for duty with the Army of Tennessee.

If I might be allowed the suggestion, I would say that since the loss of general officers in that army he is probably more needed there than here.

W. J. HARDEE,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ANDERSON'S COMMAND,

McKenzie's, January 8, 1865.

Lieutenant M. G. HUDSON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

LIEUTENANT: I have the honor to report that in accordance with orders from the major-general commanding and General Anderson, I carried the dispatches yesterday from the major-general commanding and delivered them to Captain Audenried, U. S. Army, bearer of the Federal flag of truce. Captain Audenried had left Hardeeville before I arrived there, and I followed him on the road to Screven's Ferry until I reached the advance picket-post of the enemy, about one mile this side of Cheves' house and about five miles from Screven's Ferry. There were no indications of any large bodies of men having moved beyond their present position. The trees felled by us remain undisturbed, and certainly no wagons or artillery have come nearer than Mrs. Fitz's house (about two miles). The bridge over New River has