War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0974 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Falling Creek Church, N. C., March 23, 1865.

Major MAX. WOODHULL, Asst. Adjt. General, Fifteenth Army Corps:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report the following as the operations of this command during the day: Broke camp near Mill Creek at 7. 30 a. m., and following the Fourth Division, marched eleven miles on the Goldsborough road, encamping at 4 p. m. on south side of main road. The First Brigade is in line fronting south, its left connecting with the right of the Fourth Division. The Second Brigade is on the right of the First, in column by regiments. The artillery and trains are in rear of the right of the First Brigade. These headquarters are in rear of the right of First Brigade, on the right of the artillery and about twenty-five yards south of main road.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. SMITH,

Brevet Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Neuse River, N. C., March 23, 1865--4. 10 p. m.

Captain A. M. VAN DYKE,

Asst. Adjt. General, Department and Army of the Tennessee:

CAPTAIN: My command will encamp this afternoon within two miles of the river, and will all be in before dark. My First Division is now in camp. The only water between Falling Creek and this point was on ground occupied by the Second Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, or I should not have moved so far.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANK P. BLAIR, JR.,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

CHIEF QUARTERMASTER'S OFFICE,

Railroad Bridge, near Kinston, March 23, 1865--5. 30 p. m.

Captain C. CADLE, Asst. Adjt. General, Seventeenth Army Corps:

I have the honor to report to you that I arrived here with the train at 2 o'clock this p. m. The road I came on is very good, and I will send the train back on the same road loaded with five days' rations for the corps, and one-quarter of clothing at this point, which amounts to 600 hats, 3,000 bluses, 3,000 pants, 600 cavalry pants, 7,500 shirts, 3,000 drawers, 9,300 shoes, 1,800 boots, 4,500 stockings, and a few other articles of no consequence. The above is hardly enough for one division, but Colonel Conklin assures me I can get all the stores I want, consequently I will remain here until I do receive them. The railroad bridge is not finished across the river at this point. Stores will be slow in coming to the front. You will please order all the wagons to be emptied and sent at once to this point. I will see they are loaded with something. I will have all the wagons here loaded before I go to bed to-night, to be ready to start at daylight to-morrow morning. I have just heard that a large mail will be here some time during the night. I will retain wagons and send it as soon as I can.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. M. JOEL,

Lieutenant Colonel and Chief Quartermaster, Seventeenth Army Corps.

P. S. --I just heard Boucher is a lieutenant-colonel.