War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0954 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Mill Creek, N. C., March 22, 1865.

Captain A. M. VAN DYKE,

Asst. Adjt. General, Department and Army of the Tennessee:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to inquire at what hour I shall burn the bridge across Mill Creek and withdraw General Woods' division preparatory to the movement from this point.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. LOGAN,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Near Mill Creek, N. C., March 22, 1865.

Major General JOHN A. LOGAN,

Commanding Fifteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: I am directed by the general to say, in answer to your note, that General Woods' division may be withdrawn at any time, leaving a strong picket at the bridge, which you may burn toward morning.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. VAN DYKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

NEAR FALLING CREEK, March 22, 1865.

Major MAX WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: I received last night from General Howard an order to move the trains this morning to Everettsville, and am pulling out early this morning. The roads are said to be bad. A brigade of the Twenty-fifth Army corps are here and will be in our rear. I apprehend no danger. No train has been started for Kinston yet, for the reason that there was no guard for it, and then Colonel Carpenter has not yet arrived with the empty wagons from the front. Everettsville will be on the way, however, and the empty part of the train can keep directly on.

I am, major, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

G. L. FORT,

Lieutenant Colonel and Chief Quartermaster, Fifteenth Army Corps.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Mill Creek, N. C., Mach 22, 1865.

Major MAX WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fifteenth Army Corps:

MAJOR: I respectfully report that my skirmishers were thrown forward a short time before daylight this a. m., and that they soon ascertained the enemy had withdrawn, as shown in my note this morning.

The Second Brigade, Colonel Catterson commanding, was, by direction of Major-General Logan, very shortly afterward started out toward Bentonville on the Smithfield road, with a view to ascertaining the movements of the rebels. Passing beyond Mill Creek at Bentonville, Colonel Catterson soon met with the rear guard of the rebel column