War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0826 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Warsaw Road, N. C., March 14, 1865.

Major MAX. WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fifteenth Army Corps:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that this command moved at 3 p. m. Halted at Cape Fear River one hour, then crossed on pontoon bridge. At this point the refugees, surplus negroes, and animals were left behind. The command moved out to the Warsaw road two miles, where camped, having marched four miles.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. B. HAZEN,

Major-General.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Feyetteville, N. C., March 14, 1865.

Major M. WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fifteenth Army Corps:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that this division broke camp on plank road two miles west of Fayetteville at 11 this a. m. and moved, crossing Cape Fear River on pontoon bridge, out on Goldsborough road one mile east of Fayetteville. The column commenced crossing the river at 5. 30 p. m. The rear guard passed over at 8. 45 p. m. Much delay was caused by the rapid falling of the water. The command is encamped in line on north side of the road, fronting east. These headquarters are on the south side of the road, and opposite the right flank of the division.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. SMITH,

Brevet Major-General.

HDQRS. FOURTH DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

In the Field, near Cape Fear River, N. C., March 14, 1865.

Major MAX. WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fifteenth Army Corps:

MAJOR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the movements of my division this instant: Pursuant to orders from corps headquarters, I broke camp at daylight, moving to the pontoons across Cape Fear River, which I found, at 9 a. m., still occupied by the Seventeenth Army Corps, and undergoing repairs. I did not succeed in getting possession of the bridge until 12. 30 p. m., at which hour my command commenced crossing, and encamped for the night nearly in rear of the Seventeenth Army Corps, about two miles distant from the river. Owing to the great number of refugees traveling with my command, exceeding 1,100, who have been subsisted during past twentythree days, besides the draft upon my stores for four days' rations during their transit to Wilmington, I find the supplies of my division reduced to something like eight days' on hand, including four of hard bread. A portion of my hard bread became damaged during the storm on the night of the 9th instant.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN M. CORSE,

Brevet Major-General.