War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0820 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,, Numbers 64.

Hilton Head, S. C., March 13, 1865.

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II. The One hundred and forty-fourth New York Volunteers are hereby relieved from duty in the Northern District, Department of the South, and will proceed without delay to Hilton Head, S. C. The quartermaster's department will furnish the necessary transportation.

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V. The Thirty-second U. S. Colored Troops is hereby relieved from duty in the Northern District, Department of the South, and will return without delay to their camp on Edisto Island, S. S. The quartermaster's department will furnisch the necessary transportation.

By command of Major General Q. A. Gellmore:

THORNDIKE D. HODGES,

Captain, Thirty-fifth U. S. Colored Troops, Actg. Asst. Adjt. General

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., March 13, 1865.

Brigadier General J. P. HATCH,

Commanding Northern Dist., Dept. of the South, Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: I am directed by the major-general commanding to inform you that he has to send three regiments of white troops from your command to Wilmington, N. C., and wishes an aggregate of about 1,800 men, and suggests as the best regiments the Fifty-forth and Fifty-sixth New York Volunteers and the Fifty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers. If, however, you desire to keep any one of these regiments you are requested to inform these headquarters without delay of the change you make. The regiments must be put in readiness for immediate embarkation. The transportation will be sent to you as soon as possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. L. M. BURGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., March 13, 1865.

Colonel STEWART L. WOODFORD,

Commanding Post of Charleston, Dept. of the South, Charleston, S. C.:

COLONEL: I desire to state for your information that it is not the policy of this department to foster the commercial interests of the city of Cahrleston, and that that only trade which it is desirable to encourage and protect there is simply that whiuch is necessary to supply the necessities of the ingabitants, and prevent their becoming a source of expense to the United States. The permanent garrison for Charleston will not exceed 2,500 men, that being a sufficient force in my judgment to preserve quiet in the city and hold the forts and approaches which command it. The accumulation of large quantities of merchandise at that point is therefore to be carefully avoided. Indeed, nothing but the necessaries of life should be allowd to come to the place, and in moderate quantities. Without prescribing any special rules for your