War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0757 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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a. m., crossed Jordan's Creek (following Second Division), and moved on neighborhood roads via Leitch's Mills and Gilchrist's Bridge, crossing Lumber River at the latter point to near Randlsville. At Leitch's Mills the road, which before the rain commenced falling had been quite good, became impassable. Nearly all of the commissary train and First Brigade remained at this point all night, the men hauling out wagons with ropes, it being impossible to find ground sufficiently solid for animals to stand upon. Upon arriving at Gilchrist's Bridge, Major-General Logan ordered two or three regiments and ppioneer corps to be sent to Randalsville. I immediately sent the Second Brigade, consisting of three regiments, and the corps. They bivouacked at 6. 30 oc'lock, within half a mile of Randalsville, with out their transportation. The artillery and ordnance trains were parked between the hours of 8 p. m. and midnight on McCann's plantation, four miles from the river. A few of the forage and regimental wagons reached the same place between midnight and daylight. From the information received this morning, I think all of my trains will arrive during the a. m. Distance marached, fourteen miles, seven of which were corduroyed. I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. SMITH,

Brevet Major-General.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Big Raft Swamp, N. C., March 10, 1865.

Major M. WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fifteenth Army Corps:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that the First Brigade and supply trains having arrived at about noon, I moved forward, crossing Lowry and Big Raft Swamps, and camping at 6 p. m. upon the west side of the latter wherever I could find ground sufficiently solidt to hold up the wagons. Distance marched, four miles, three of which were corduroyed.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. SMITH,

Brevet Major-General.

HDQRS. FOURTH DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

In the Field, McNeill's Plantation, N. C., March 10, 1865.

Major MAX. WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fifteenth Army Corps:

MAJOR: I have the honor to submit the folloiwng as a report of the movmenets of my division the 9th instant: Pursuant to orders from corps headquarters I broke camp at springfield at 6 a. m. and moved to Laurel Hill, traversing two seaprate roads-the telegraph road and a road intersecting it from Springfield. From Laure Hill I moved in rear of the Second Division to Johnson's plantation, in which vicinity I placed my command in bivouac at 11 p. m. Owing to the heavy rain and the bad condition of the roads, rendered so by the passing of the Second Division trains, I had commenced placing my command in bivouac at McNair's plantation at 6 p. m., when, receiving impertive orders from the major-general commanding crops, through an aide, to move across Lumber River, I again drew out my command, and feeling my way through the intense darkness, continued forward with the head of