War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0633 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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Lieutenant Colonel S. T. Hughes, commanding Ninth Illinois Mounted Infantry, will cause all foragers he may find in advance of the column to be dismounted and sent back in arrest.

Division commanders will cause their pickets to be instructed to permit no foragers to pass to the front from the camp.

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By command of Major General F. P. Blair:

C. CADLE, JR.,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING, ARMY OF GEORGIA,

Near Bridge, Lynch's Creek, S. C., March 1, 1865.

Major-General SHERMAN,

Commanding Army:

GENERAL: I have just heard from General Davis; at 11 o'clock this morning his advance had reached Hanging Rock and the corps was coming along well.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. SLOCUM,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING,

[March 1, 1865]-8. 15 p.m.

Major L. M. DAYTON,

Aide-de-Camp:

One of my staff officers has just come from the Fourteenth Army Corps. Morgan's division, with his train, is in camp on Litle Lynch's Creek, where General Ward encamped last night. The other two divisions are near that point. I think we can push the Twentieth Corps fifteen miles to-morrow. Davis will very soon be up up with us. He will takea road to the left after reaching this point. If he is short of forage he will go to McManus' Bridge from Horton's Tavern.

Very respectfully,

H. W. SLOCUM,

Major-General.

HORTON'S TAVERN, March 1, 1865-6 a.m.

Major-General DAVIS:

GENERAL: The Twentieth Army Corps encamped at this point last night. A force was sent forward to Ferily's Ford. A good bridge was found at that point which we now hold. This corps will cross Lynch's Creek to-day and move over to Tompson's or Johnson's on Rocky Creek. McManus' Bridge is in good order, and when you reach this point you move to that bridge via Hickory Head. This will bring you on the road it was intended you should take. I hope you will press forward as rapidly as possible, as General Sherman is extremely anxious on the subject and has good reasons of his anxiety. Press your command as hard as you dare to. Howard is at Cheraw.

Yours, truly,

H. W. SLOCUM,

Major-General.

I wish you to report tome at least once a day, and if possible oftener.