War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0610 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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ing over the river, but will not be able to complete their task before to-morrow. A staff officer sent this forenoon reports the route by way of McCrougan's and Young's Bridges to be in every way practicable, and the road entirely clear.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. R. WOODS,

Brevet Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Tiller's Bridge, S. C., February 28, 1865.

Major General WILLIAM B. HAZEN,

Commanding Second Division, Fifteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: On effecting a crossing of Lynch's Creek, the general commanding desires you to move to a good position and await further orders.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MAX. WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Tiller's Bridge, S. C., February 28, 1865.

Brevet Major-Geneal CORSE,

Commanding Fourth Division, Fifteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: I am directed by the general commanding to transmit herewith a copy of a note* just received from Major-General Howard relative to the advanced position occupied by the Seventeenth corps and to invite your attention to the imperative necessity of effecting a crossing of Lynch's Creek with your whole command at the earliest moment practicable consistent with the preservation of your ammunition and subsistence.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MAX. WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. FOURTH DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

In the Field, Lynch's Creek, S. C., February 28, 1865.

Major MAX WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fifteenth Army Corps:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that my division has remained in the position occupied by it on the evening of the 26th instant. Most of my train, as you are aware, being cut off from the division by the high water, is the reason for its remaining in bivouac. I have had heavy details at work on the road during the entire day, making it passable for my trains, and shall attempt to cross them at 8 p.m. I have pushed my mounted foraging details well to the front, and from different reports learn that no very important force of the enemy eihter threatens or is in close proximity to my front, but that a force simply sufficient to watch our movements is in this vicinity.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN M. CORSE,

Brevet Major-General.

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*See Van Dyke to Logan, p. 609.

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