War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0600 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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pontoon in the first field on right hand side of road coming this way, after crossing. The train of the First division, and perhaps part of the Fourth Division, will be in the same field. You may keep your men in their present camp to-night and move them over early in the morning. Your position will be second in column, following the First Division, which will start at 7 a.m.

Very respectfully,

C. CADLE, JR.,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

February 27, 1865.

Brigadier General M. F. FORCE,

Commanding Third Division:

GENERAL: I sent your orders this evening to cross your trains to-night and leave your troops in their present camp till morning. It will be late before you have the bridge, but you will be all right to take your place in the morning by pushing your train over to-night.

Very respectfully,

C. CADLE, JR.,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. THIRD DIV., 17TH ARMY CORPS, Numbers 48.

Lynch's Creek, S. C., February 27, 1865.

* * * * *

II. The hour of marching is 6. 30 a.m. to-morrow.

The First Brigade, Colonel C. Fairchild commanding, will have the advance.

The Second Brigade, Colonel G. F. Wiles commanding, will follow the First Brigade.

The artillery and trains will move in the usual order.

By order of Brigadier General M. F. Force:

J. C. DOUGLASS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Rocky Mount Crossing, Catawba River, February 27, 1865 - 1. 30 p.m.

Captain DECHERT,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: Your communication is just received. Majot Guindon dispatches the general commanding this morning. The bridge is being laid in a new place and bids fair of being a success. The current was thought to be still too rapid at the old one immediately below the falls. The bridge will probably be done by 4 o'clock this evening, and I shall make every exertion to cross and be on the march to-morrow morning at daylight. This is the best that can possibly be hoped for under the circumstances. I am doing everything that man can do, but I cannot dry up the river that separates my command; it has fallen about eighteen inches and is still falling. I do not know what the emergency is in the front, but presume it must be very great, judging by the general's dispatches, and am working accordingly. Kilpatrick reported to me