War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0589 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Hough's Bridge, S. C., February 26, 1865.

Captain C. CADLE, Jr.,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Seventeenth Army Corps:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that this crossing was vacated for my command at 5,45 p.m. to-day. The road was so badly destroyed as to make it impracticable to pass my train, the bottom having utterly given out in some places, and the turns necessary to keep an army wagon from going out of sight, rendered it impossible to get a pontoon wagon on the bridge. I set a heavy at work, and by midnight will have a good bridge and corduroy entirely across. Will move at daylight.

I have the honor to be, captain, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. F. FORCE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Ingraham's House, S. C., February 26, 1865.

Major General H. W. SLOCUM,

Commanding Left Wing:

GENERAL: The general-in-chief would like to hear all the news from General Davis which you get during the night as soon as you can left him; he also thinks you should hold the Twentieth Corps in its present camp until General Davis has crossed the river and began his march.

I am, general, respectfully, &c.,

L. M. DAYTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

East Bank of Catawba River, February 26, 1865 - 9 a.m.

Captain DECHERT,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Left Wing:

CAPTAIN: Misfortunates never some single. The work of crossing the trains was continued last night until about 12,30 o'clock, when the bridge gave way in the center. All the boats but two have been recovered. The balking were lost. The river is still rising, and it is doubtful if the anchors will hold the boats in their places against the heavy current. Material to reconstruct the bridge is being gathered from houses, and an attempt to relay it will be made as soon as possible. The roads still continue to be impassable, and corduroy has to be made in every direction where a wagon is to be driven. The weather seems to indicate signs to clearing off. If so, the river, I think, will soon run down and the roads dry up so as to enable us to get on. In the meantime say to the general that we will not lose one moment.

I am, very respectfully,

JEFF. C. DAVIS,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.