War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0573 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Copeland's, S. C., February 25, 1865.

Captain C. CADLE, Jr.,

Assistant Adjutant-General.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that this command camps at Copeland's to-night. The advance reached it at 7 p.m., and at this writing, 8. 30 p.m., the supply train and bridge train are still to come in. The roads are terrible. At the least calculation I have built four miles of corduroy to-day. Men and animals are both extremely tired. The bridge train parked three miles in rear of my division last night. Copeland's is on the east bank of Flat Rock Creek, two miles north of Flat Rock Post-Office.

I am, captain, very truly, yours,

M. F. FORCE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, February 25, 1865.

Major-General SLOCUM,

Commanding Left Wing:

GENERAL: It is plain that we must reduce our trains. If you will order General Davis to burn his trains beyond the river and double his teams I can make up 100 or 200 wagons out of the headquarters trains and from Howard when we meet at Cheraw. He could discriminate as to contents, giving the preference to those containing salt, sugar, coffee, and bread. Of course the pontoon train must be carried along.

I am, yours, &c.,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, February 25, 1865.

General SLOCUM, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: General Sherman would like to know if General Williams is to move to-day. If he is, General Sherman would like to see you, but he counsels lying by until better weather, or at least to-day.

Very respectfully, yours,

L. M. DAYTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING, ARMY OF GEORGIA,

In the Field, near Warrenton, S. C., February 25, 1865 - 8 p.m.

Bvt. Major General J. C. DAVIS,

Commanding Fourteenth Corps:

GENERAL: I am directed by the major-general commanding to say that if your it impossible to get your wagons over the river you had better destroyed them and double your teams, being careful to preserve your ammunition, salt, sugar, coffee, and hard bread, and the pontoon train. Should you find it necessary to destroy any of your wagons they will be made up to you from other sources.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. P. DECHERT,

Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.