War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0529 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Camp near Peay's Ferry, S. C., February 22, 1865.

Major MAX WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fifteenth Army Corps:

MAJOR: I respectfully report that at 6. 30 o'clock this morning I received orders to march and at once started on the road toward Mickles' Ferry, as directed. Turning at Harrison's to the left, I sent forward two regiments to the ferry for the purpose of making the demonstration ordered. No evidence of the enemy was found at the ferry. Continuing on the road toward Peay's Ferry, I arrived in its vicinity at 4 p.m., going into temporary camp with my troops, where I am at present awaiting orders. My headquarters are at Peay's plantation.

I am, major, very respectfully,

C. R. WOODS,

Brevet Major-General.

HDQRS. FIRST Brigadier, FIRST DIV., 15TH ARMY CORPS,

In the Field, S. C., February 22, 1865.

Captain FRED H. WILSON,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, First Division, 15th Army Corps:

CAPTAIN: In compliance with your request, I have the honor to forward the following statement of the number of soldiers captured during the night of the fire at Columbia, S. C., by this brigade; Fifteenth Army Corps, 136 enlisted men; Seventeenth Army Corps, 260 enlisted men; total, 396.

I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, &c.,

W. B. WOODS,

Brevet Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Liberty Hill, S. C., February 22, 1865.

Major MAX WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have the honor to state that until the reception of Special Orders, Numbers 53, of this date, from headquarters Fifteenth Army Corps, I had supposed the mounting of foragers authorized, if not in orders, at least from custom and necessity. Upon this supposition I had directed my brigade commanders to mount about 5 per cent. of their command for the purpose of gathering food. They had done this at no little trouble and had just reported that they could subsist their brigades with but little assistance from the commissary of subsistence. This cannot be done without mounting the foragers, and as our main supplies must be derived this way, I would most respectfully call especial attention to this subject. Late orders regulating issues from the wagons make it necessary for each division of the army to procure from the country about 7,000 pounds of food daily, which amounts do not exist along the immediate lines of march, but must be procured from points more or less remote along the flanks. It is as much as footmen can do to make long marches along the straight lines of the road. I have given the subject of foraging my closet attention since it was adopted as our means of subsisting the army, and have at no time permitted more than the minimum number necessary to perform

34 R R-VOL XLVII, PT II