War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0512 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington City, February 21, 1865.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a communication from Colonel James A. Hardie, inspector-general U. S. Army, dated 10th instant, furnishing extracts for the information of the Quartermaster-General concerning the march of General Sherman's army to Savannah, &c. The remarks on the march of infantry alongside of the trains are interesting. The Quartermaster-General in passing over the route of the rebel march to Gettysburg otice that thishad been the practice of that army, the troops marching in the fields on each side of the turnpike, which was occupied by the trains. In regard to the suffering for want of forage after the arrival of General Sherman's army at Savannah, from all that the Quartermaster-General could learn while at Savannah, it resulted from the delay in opening navigable communication with Hilton Head, tow hich point all the forage ordered by the military authority was ordered from the North, with the exception of a portiion sent by General Grant's order to Pensacola. Daily shipments equivalent to 35,000 rations were made from the time it was evident that General Sherman would strike the coast at Savannah, and the Quartermaster-General believes that these shipments were regularly made. The exceeding roughness of the weather delayed some of the vessels. One arrived while the Quartermaster-General was at Savannah, having been twenty-four days out of New York. All that was possible was done, and with greater success than is recorded of such great movmeents in other countries. General Sherman left some 4,000 animals at Savannah and informed the Quartermaster-General that he had enough. The loss appears to have fallen principally upon the artillery and cavalry which remained in Savannah, expecting every day that the obstructions would be removed and supplies brought up.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, and Brevet Major-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 24.

Washington, February 21, 1865.

Ordered, That a national salute be fired to-morrow noon, February 22, at West Point, and at every fort, arsenal, and army headquarters of the United States, in honor of the restoration of flag of the Union upon Fort Sumter.

By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, February 21, 1865.

Major-General HOWARD:

Your dispatch of yesterday is to hand. This column is moving as per your orders received and will reach the point designated. Generals