War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0495 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, TWENTY-THIRD ARMY CORPS,

February 19, 1865-10. 30 a.m.

Major J. A. CAMPBELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

The train has just come within reach. I move out with Ames' division, leaving the two brigades of my own to draw rations and follow. Have no answer as yet to my dispatch of 6. 30 this morning.

J. D. COX,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

February 19, 1865-10. 45 a.m.

Major-General COX,

Commanding Division:

GENERAL: The enemy has evacuated Fort Anderson and retired from Terry's front. The general is aboard the admiral's flag-ship and I cannot send him your message. Moore and Henderson were supplied with rations last night from boats, so that they will not have to rely on that train to feed them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. CAMPBELL,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, TWENTY-THIRD ARMY CORPS,

February 19, 1865-8. 30 p.m.

Major J. A. CAMPBELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

My advance brigade occupies the commanding ground on this side of Town Creek. The other brigades are echeloned in rear. The enemy made but slight resistance until they reached the creek. They have a line of infantry trench on the upper bank, and are believed to have destroyed the bridge. They fired a few cannon shot at Henderson as he advanced. The creek is very crooked and deep. The water is said to be thirty or forty feet deep, being deeper than the river. I learned of a flat-boat, capable of carrying near 100 men, a short distance below our camp, and ordered it secured and carefully protected. No detour can be made to the left, so as to cross the creek by foring, short of fifteen miles above. The next bridge was ten miles above, and that is probably destroyed. If the enemy resist stubbornly and in force on the road, I think our only feasible way of crossing will be by the flat under cover of the fire of the gun-boats. I cannot learn that any force but Hagood's brigade is in front of us. The colored people say they commenced their retreat early in the night, the rear guard leaving Fort Anderson about daybreak. They undoubtedly began the mvoement immediately after learninging that their cavalry were driven from the head of Orton Pond by our advancing column. Please inform me early as to the commanding general's desires in regard to pushing my movement on this side of the river.

Very respectfully, &c.,

J. D. COX,

Major-General, Commanding.