War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0462 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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Saluda, at a point to be indicated by Captain Steele, aide-de-camp, with the exception of fifteen ammunition wagons and ambulances, which will be taken with your division across Broad River. The artillery will accompany your column.

Very respectfully,

A. HICKENLOOPER,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Inspector-General.

HDQRS. FOURTH DIVISION, SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Columbia, S. C., February 17, 1865.

Major General F. P. BLAIR,

Commanding Seventeenth Army Corps:

The colors of the Thirteenth Iowa were suspended over the capitol at 11 o'clock this forenoon. National salute is now being fired by Captain Clayton, First Minnesota Battery, to commemorate this event.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GILES A. SMITH,

Brevet Major-General.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

February 17, 1865.

[Lieutenant Colonel A. C. McCLURG:]

COLONEL: I regret to have to inform the general commanding the corps that I have missed the road he ordered me to take, and am now on the Newberry road. I marched up the road along Saluda River to a road leading by a church, which I was informed by a negro resident of the vicinity was Dutch Church. But this proved erroneous, and the road brought me into this road ahead of General Morgan. I still through I was right till I had marched several miles, and then concluded that the loss of time would not justify a return to the other raod. I hope no inconvenience will result from the mistake.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. P. CARLIN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, FOURTEENTH CORPS,

Near Mett's House, February 17, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel A. C. McCLURG,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: Say to the general commanding that on reaching this point, after much detention at the bridge and much labor on the road, Captain Remington reported to me that his trains could not get this far and park before 10 p.m. I therefore put the leading brigade in camp and am camping the trains as they come in. My troops alone or with the trains can march at any hour in the morning. I think, however, we have gained by making a little interval and letting the trains close up.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. BAIRD,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding Division.