War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0439 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Federal Point, N. C., February 15, 1865.

Major General J. D. COX,

Commanding Third Division, Twenty-third Army Corps:

GENERAL: The commanding general directs that you move your command to Smithville to-morrow. Have your advance at the Federal Point wharf at 8 a. m. The commanding general will inform you to-night how many men the boats can carry at once. Transportation for the luggage will be furnished by the quartermaster's department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. CAMPBELL,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

ARMY OF THE OHIO,

Federal Point, N. C., February 15, 1865.

COMMANDING OFFICER 111TH REGIMENT OHIO INFANTRY:

SIR: The commanding general directs that you proceed with your command by steamer this p. m. to Smithville. Colonel Dodge, chief quartermaster, will designate the steamer on which you will embark.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. CAMPBELL,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION.

TWENTY-THIRD ARMY CORPS Numbers 13.

Federal Point, N. C. Februaryb 15, 1865.

I. The command will move to Smithville to-morrow morning. The Second Brigade, Brevet Brigadier-General Casement commanding, will move at 7 a. m. to the landing at the point.

The First and Third Brigades will be held in readiness to move, and await further orders.

By command of Major-General Cox:

THEO. COX,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

SMITHVILLE AND FORT CASWELL, N. C.,

February 15, 1865.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Department of North Carolina:

SIR: I have the honor to report that, in obedience to orders received from Major-General Schofield, I made a reconnaissance from this point to-day. I took 300 infantry, and with it proceeded up the road running to Fort Anderson. About three miles from this poitn encountered about forty cavalry, who retired before us. About five miles from here, at White Springs, again met cavalry re-enforced to about 100. I was informed by citizens and negroes that these troops belonged to a South Carolina regiment which was encamped about three miles above White Springs. I found the roads in good condition and nearly all of the citizens living at home. There has been no force of the enemy this