War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0433 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HDQRS. FOURTH DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

In the Field, near Congaree Creek, S. C., February 15, 1865.

Major MAX. WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fifteenth Army Corps:

MAJOR: I have the honor to detail the movements of my command during the day, as follows: I broke camp at 8 a. m. sharp, and moved in rear of the Second Division of this corps on the Orangeburg and Columbia road, making repeated halts, owing to the detention of the advance division by the enemy's skirmishers, which were struck at an early hour in the morning. At 4. 30 p. m. I had reached a point two miles from the Congaree Creek, and commenced placing my command in bivouac when I received orders from corps headquarters to move my command forward upon the above-named creek, where I arrived at 6 p. m., and placed my command in position, as follows: Third Brigade across the creek and on the right-hand side of the road, and the remaining two brigades on the right bank of the creek on either side of the road, remaining in this position during the night.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN M. CORSE,

Brevet Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

On Congaree Creek, S. C., February 15, 1865.

Lieutenantl-Colonel TWEEDDALE,

Commanding First Missouri Engineers:

COLONEL: The major-general commanding directs me to request you to move your command in rear of the Third Division of this corps, which will break camp to-morrow morning at 7 a. m.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MAX. WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

In the Field, near Columbia, February 15, 1865.

Major General F. P. BLAIR,

Commanding Seventeenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: The general commanding directs that to-morrow morning you cross Congaree Creek at either of the bridges in your front, and reconnoiter the second line of the enemy with a view to the passage of Congaree River, and the movement on Columbia. General Logan broke their line at the crossing of the Congaree Creek, and moving forward found a second line about a mile in advance of the first and along the heights this side of the river, and within full view of the city. The general desires that you keep him informed during the day of the success of your movements.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant.

A.m. VAN DYKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

28 R R-VOL XLVII, PT II