War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0421 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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the left on the Orangeburg and Columbia road, a distance of four miles, when I placed my command in bivouac on the right and left of road, having marched nine miles.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN M. CORSE,

Brevet Major-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. FOURTH DIV., 15TH ARMY CORPS, Numbers 18

February 14, 1865.

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VI. The troops composing this division will march at 7 a. m. to-morrow, the 15th instant, on Congaree Creek, in the following order, and as the road is of sufficient width to admit of the train and troops to march abreast, the troops will therefore move by the side of the trains, giving the best track to the latter; battery to move at the head of trains.

First. Third Brigade Infantry, Colonel Hurlbut: second, First Brigade, General Rice; third, Second Brigade, Colonel Adams. Trains to move in the same order as to-day, the 14th instant, with exception of five wagons, which will follow battery, and the advance brigade train follow ambulances.

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By order of Bvt. Major General John M. Corse:

L. H. EVERTS,

Assistant Adjutant-General

HEADQUARTERS SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Sandy Run Post-Office, S. C., February 14, 1865.

Captain A.m. VAN DYKE, A. A. G., Dept and Army of the Tennessee:

CAPTAIN; I have the honor to report that the Ninth Illinois Mounted Infantry, and General Potts' brigade (Fourth Division), proceeded up the railroad to the Congaree River this morning. The enemy were found in a strong position, with rifle-pits on this side of the river, and numbered about 300. A small skirmish line of the Ninth Illinois (the infantry being some distance to the rear) advanced on them and stampeded them toward the bridge. They were in such haste that they set fire to the bridge (which had been prepared for burning with turpentine) before the whole force was over. Those who were cut off, except two of the Forty-third Georgia, who were captured, took to the swamp and could not be followed. The enemy after crossing continued their retreat, and the Ninth Illinois moved up to the bank and stood on the bridge without being molested. A pontoon could have been laid there easily. The Ninth Illinois have returned to camp. General Potts' bridge is encamped about ten miles from here, and will move forward at daylight in the morning. The trestle and culverts on the railroad were all destroyed, and the Third Division worked on the road from the State road north until 12 m., completely destroying the part passed over. I estimate the destruction of the road, including the two miles below Orangeburg, and the trestle and culverts, at twenty miles.

FRANK P. BLAIR, JR.,

Major-General.

P. S. - This report would have been sent in sooner had General Pott's bridge and the Third Division been heard from.

F. P. B.,

Major-General.