War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0417 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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but there was no general engagement. Grimball's is on the Stono River, two miles southwest of Charleston, and the Ashley River, a wide stream, lies between it and the city. This demonstration of the enemy is believed to be a feint.

The following dispatch, received late Sunday night, is the official report of this affair. It contains also other interesting intelligence:

"CHARLESTON, February 11.

"General S. COOPER,

"Adjutant and Inspector General:

"The enemy last evening drove in our pickets on James Island. The lines have been re-established to-day. The enemy are still in strong force on the island, but the movement is believed to be only a demonstration. There is an increase to-day of eighteen steamers off the bar. A barge attack made to-night upon Battery Tompkins [Simkins] was repulsed.

"W. J. HARDEE,

"Lieutenant-General. "

Since the receipt of the above we are without advices from Charleston.

On Saturday a column of Sherman's infantry and cavalry crossed the Edisto to the west of and above Branchville, and advanced on the Columbia Branch Railroad. Our troops at Branchville withdrew toward Columbia. According to the last official accounts, received yesterday, the enemy were at Orangeburg, some twenty miles north of Branchville and on the road to Columbia.

During our retreat there has been continual skirmishing with the enemy, but no general engagement. It was said here yesterday that Beauregard intended to make an attack, but we think from present indications it is more likely he will fall back beyond the Santee and defend the line of that river. He is said to have an adequate force for either an offensive or defensive policy, whichever he may find it expedient to adopt. Columbia is on the right bank of the Santee, about fifty miles west of north of Orangeburg.

IMPORTANT FROM NORTH CAROLINA. - A HEAVY YANKEE COLUMN THREATENING AN ADVANCE ON RALEIGH.

Unofficial intelligence has been received here that a force of the enemy, estimated at 20,000 men, have landed at New Berne. It is believed to be their object to advance at once upon Raleigh, or at least upon our lines of railroad in North Carolina. They are said to have brought with them five locomotives and railroad iron sufficient to lay forty or fifty miles of track.

FROM EAST TENNESSEE.

The report reached us yesterday that Stoneman and Burbridge were preparing to make a raid from Tennessee into North Carolina, in the direction of Raleigh with the hope of co-operating with the column now said to be on foot to invade the State from the Atlantic coast. We give this for what it may be worth.

From the Whig:

FROM WILMINGTON, FEBRUARY 13.

There has been considerable skirmishing on our lines at Sugar Loaf. On Saturday the enemy made three attacks in force, which were handsomely repulsed. During the attack the enemy's whole fleet opened on Hoke's left. Our casualties are about twenty men. The same day one monitor threw several shells at Fort Anderson, killing 1 and wounding 1. All quiet since.

EXCHANGE OF PRISONERS.

We learn that 1,050 of our prisoners have been brought under the Yankee flag of truce to Aiken's Landing, and are awaiting transportation thence to Richmond, which could not be effected yesterday on account of the ice in the river.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

27 R R-VOL XLVII, PT II