War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0267 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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but would be pushed into Newark by passenger train, by which time the repairs would be made, as the stem of the plunger to the pump only had to be strengthened. Nos. 27 and 28 are ready to leave here and we have four engines here which are being made ready and crew rested. I see no difficulty in keeping up to the Baltimore and Ohio facilities, and, compared with the movement of trains on the other road east of Columbus, the percentage is much in our favor. When we consider the number of trains and all irregular, as to accidents we have escaped beyond my anticipations and with present extraordinary care.

THOMAS LOUGH.

188.] ZANESVILLE, January 26, 1865.

THOMAS LOUGH,

Columbus, Ohio:

Your dispatch received. I do not mean to find fault; on the contrary I am most gratified we have got along so well, and without accident; but I can but think it would have been still better if all westbound trains had been stopped yesterday morning, and only engines gone west, and in this I think Mr. Jewett concurs. However, let this pass, and if we can only get all along safely and without delay, and the soldiers have coffee and plenty of straw, we will all agree that the job has been well done. The Baltimore and Ohio have been waiting since last evening at 7 o'clock. Let me hear when the last train has left Cincinnati and Columbus.

LEWIS B. PARSONS,

Colonel and Chief of Rail and River Transportation.

188 1/2.] BELLAIRE, January 26, 1865.

Colonel PARSONS,

Zanesville:

Have just got in. Some men will have to lie over to-night. I think this will be the place for you.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.

189.] ZANESVILLE, January 26, 1865-12 m.

Mr. CRONAN,

Agent Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Bellaire:

There will be seven trains in very soon, and nearly at the same time. I hope the commissary will have a great abundance of coffee, as the soldiers have been long out. Please push the trains off as fast as possible with safety. Major-General Couch will remain with you for a day or more.

LEWIS B. PARSONS,

Colonel and Chief of Rail and River Transportation.