War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0196 OPERATIONS IN N. C. S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS, Numbers 32.

Hickory Hill Post-Office, S. C., February 1, 1865.

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II. Whenever practicable, division commanders will move their troops alongside of their trains, studying always to give the road to their wagons. The column in marching must be kept closed up, and no division should occupy more than its legitimate space in the road when everything is well closed up. A detachment of the pioneer corps will precede the infantry column and clear away a road for its passage alongside of that on which the wagon train is moving. Division commanders will invariably march their commands in four-rank formation; moving in column of twos will only be allowed when necessary to pass a defile or to turn temporary obstructions.

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By order of Major General John A. Logan:

MAX. WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Hickory Hill Post-Office, S. C., February 1, 1865.

Major MAX WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fifteenth Army Corps:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that during the skirmishing at Hickory Hill Post-Office to-day, one man of the Ninth Iowa Veteran Infantry (Third Brigade), Sergt. Marshall House, Company F, was severely wounded in the thigh; leg since amputated. No other casualties in this division.

I am, Major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRED. H. WILSON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Sand Hill Church, S. C., February 1, 1865-8 p.m.

Major WOODHULL, &c.:

I have the honor to report that, night overtaking me here with the division in my front still passing, I encamped my division at this point, five miles from Hickory Hill Post-Office. I must ask pardon for referring to the method of marching the foot troops on the flanks of the Artillery and trains. My own division was marched by this method all the distance, excepting one day from Atlanta to the Ogeechee River, and found it at all times entirely practicable, by so doing shortening the column by one-half. Thirty men with axes and fifteen without in front of the leading troops can always prepare the roads as fast as troops will march. The infantry in my front to-day was marched, with the exception of a few regiments, in two ranks with long intervals, at same time prolonging the column of one division to five miles, all of which would not interfere with the progress of the troops in rear if this method was used. It also adds greatly to the protection of the trains.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. B. HAZEN,

Major-General.