War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0087 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., January 18, 1865.

Bvt. Major General R. SAXTON,

Commanding District of Beaufort:

GENERAL: The Major-general commanding directs that the detachment of the One hundred and second U. S. Colored Troops, now at Beaufort, be directed to report at once to the headquarters of their regiment, now serving with the Coast Division under Brigadier General J. P. Hatch. The necessary pickets for your district will be taken from the regiments and detachments in your command.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. L. M. BURGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. COAST DIV., DEPT. OF THE SOUTH, Numbers 36.

Deveaux's Neck, S. C., January 18, 1865.

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VII. Lieutenant Colonel William Ames is hereby relieved from duty as Chief of Artillery, Coast Division, Department of the South, and ordered to report to Major General J. G. Foster, headquarters Department of the South, Hilton Head, S. C.

By command of Brigadier General J. P. Hatch:

LEONARD B. PERRY,

First Lieutenant, Fifty-fifth Mass. Vols., and Actg. Adjt. General

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Savannah, January 19, 1865.

Honorable Edwin M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: When you left Savannah a few days ago you forgot the map which General Geary had prepared for you, showing the route by which his division entered the city of Savannah, being the first troops to occupy that city. I now send it to you. I avail myself of the opportunity also to inclose you copies of all my official orders touching trade and intercourse with the people of Georgia, as well as for the establishment of the negro settlements. Delegations of the people of Georgia continue to come in and I am satisfied that, with a Little judicious handling and by a Little respect being paid to their prejudices we can create a schism in Jeff. Davis' dominions. All that I have conversed with realize the truth that slavery as an institution is defunct, and the only question that remains is, what disposition shall be made of the negroes themselves. I confess myself unable to offer a complete solution of this question, and prefer to leave it to the slower operations of time. We have given an initiative and can afford to await the working of the experiment. As to trade matters, I also think that it is to our interest to keep the people somewhat dependent upon the articles of commerce to which they have been hitherto accustomed.

General Grover is now here and will, I think, be able to manage this matter judiciously, and may gradually relax and invite cotton to come in larger quantities. But at first we should manifest no undue anxiety on that score, for the rebels would at once make use of it as a