War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0060 Chapter LIX. OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA.

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and think I can use the Savannah River up to that point. We are hard at work corduroying the roads across the rice fields by the Union Causeway. The Secretary told me I would surely receive 4,000 men from Baltimore to garrison Savannah. They are not heard of here yet.

Yours, truly,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Savannah, January [13-16], 1865.

Honorable e. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: As our mail facilities form an important link in the chain of events now transpiring, it gives me pleasure to note the peculiar energy which characterizes the agents of the department under the charge of Colonel A. H. Markland. Colonel Markland had managed this department in connection with my army to my entire satisfaction, and with a kindly interest that shows a devotion to our cause that takes him with the advance of our Army, has won its respect and my confidence.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

SPECIAL

HDQRS. MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, FIELD ORDERS,

In the Field, Savannah, Ga., Numbers 14.

January 16, 1865.

* * * * * * *

II. Surg. J. C. Morgan, Twenty-ninth Regiment Missouri Infantry Volunteers, is relieved from duty with his regiment and assigned to duty as health officer of the city of Savannah. It will be his duty to see to the prompt removal to the proper hospital of all contagious diseases, and also that the carcasses of dead animals and all offal or other matter either offensive or detrimental to health be removed with as Little delay as possible. To facilitate the execution of these duties he will at once put himself in communication with the general commanding the post.

By order of Major General W. T. Sherman:

L. M. DAYTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL

HDQRS. MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, FIELD ORDERS,

In the Field, Savannah, Ga., Numbers 15.

January 16, 1865.

I. The islands from Charleston south, the abandoned rice-fields along the rivers for thirty miles back from the sea, and the country bordering the Saint John's River, Fla., are reserved and set apart for the settlement of the negroes now made free by the acts of war and the proclamation of the President of the United States.