War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0052 Chapter LIX. OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA.

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engagement of Honey Hill, S. C., December 30, 1864. Colonel Hartwell gallantly led his brigade against the enemy's works and fell pierced with three wounds, his horse being shot under him. Captain Gouraud was much exposed and very efficient during the engagement, and upon the fall of Colonel Hartwell rallied and reformed his regiment. Both are earnestly recommended for the above promotion as an act of justice to their merit and a reward for their gallant conduct.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Beaufort, S. C., January 14, 1865.

Major STRONG:

(Of General Foster's staff.)

MAJOR: My bridge is laid and the forces are crossing, but the canvas is rotten. I want your bridge, boats and all, sent me by water as soon as possible by Broad River and Whale Branch to Port Royal Ferry.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., January 14, 1865.

Brigadier General JOHN P. HATCH,

Commanding Coast Division:

GENERAL: The following dispatch has just been received from the Major-general commanding, dated Savannah, Ga., January 13, 1865:

Send word to General Hatch at once that he will keep all his force with him and prepare to move on the offensive in co-operation with General Howard as soon as a forward movement is made. It is not the present purpose to withdraw General Hatch and his forces from their present position. If the regiment that was to go to Florida has not gone detain it where it is.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. L. M. BURGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL

HDQRS. MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, FIELD ORDERS,

In the Field, Savannah, Ga., Numbers 13.

January 15, 1865.

The Department of the South having been placed within the sphere of this command, and it being highly desirable that one uniform policy prevail touching commerce and intercourse with the inhabitants of the South, the following general rules and principles will be adhered to unless modified by law or the orders of the War Department.

I. Commerce with foreign nations or in an enlarged sense cannot be permitted or undertaken until the National authority is established to an extent that will give the necessary courts and offices to control and manage such matters. Trade will be confined to a limited barter and sale proportioned to the necessary wants of the army and of the inhabitants dependent on it for the necessaries of life, and even that trade must be kept subject to strict military control or surveillance.