War of the Rebellion: Serial 099 Page 0032 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., January 9, 1865.

Rear-Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN,

Commanding South Atlantic, Blockading Squadron:

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to request that you will furnish one or two armed tugs, in addition to the gun-boat at Tullifinny Landing, to cover the embarkation of General Hatch's force. This embarkation will take place between two and five days from this time.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

CITY POINT, January 10, 1865.

Honorable C. A. DANA,

Washington:

The following items are found in to-day's Richmond papers:

THE FIRE AT CHARLOTTE. -ADDITIONAL PARTICULARS.

CHARLOTTE, January 9.

The fire which occurred here Saturday morning was the result of accident. The paymaster's office, in which the fire originated, the Government warehouses, including the quartermaster's and commissary officers, and a portion of the North Carolina and Charlotte and South Carolina depot buildings were burned. The loss was at first estimated as high as $20,000,000 in present currency, but has since been greatly reduced by the quantity of grain, sugar, &c., saved from the ruins.

CHARLESTON, January 8.

A dispatch from Graham's, dated 12 p.m., says:

"No news from the enemy this morning. A gentleman just from Savannah reports that Sherman has sent the Seventeenth Army Corps round to Beaufort to co-operate with Foster's troops between Pocotaligo and Casawhatchie. "

CHARLESTON, January 9.

Nothing received from below to-day. A dispatch from Macon reports the enemy 1,000 or 2,000 strong, with wagons and Artillery, on the Ohoopee River, moving in the direction of Southwestern Georgia. General Joseph E. Johnston was in Columbia, S. C., on the 15th instant.

SUPPLIES AND RAILROADS.

A fire has occurred in a Government store-house at Charlotte, in North Carolina. It contained 40,000 bushels of corn, only 10,000 bushels of which was saved, and that in a parched condition; also some sugar, no meet. This is the loss. By what means it was caused, whether by the agency of a Yankee incendiary or simple negligence of a guard, is not yet ascertained. The public attention is much more engaged with the general facts that vast accumulations of supplies are made in that quarter which are not forwarded to the army with the diligence required by the present condition of affairs. The fault is evidently in the railroads between Richmond and Greensborough, and the blame has generally been laid on the Richmond and Danville Company.

LATEST FROM THE SOUTH AND SOUTHWEST.

The following dispatch has been received at the War Department from Macon, Ga.: "General Hood reports from Tupelo, January 6, 1865, that Thomas appeared to be moving up the Tennessee River. Until 9 a.m. on the 5th scouts report six gunboats and sixty transports had passed Savannah, going toward Eastport, loaded with troops and supplies.

" G. T. BEAUREGARD,

"Major-General. "

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.