War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 1289 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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[Fourth indorsement.

MARCH 11, 1865.

I have considered this question of burning already in reference to our establishments at Fayetteville, N. C., and decided that everything should be removed and concealed as far as possible but nothing burned or destroyed. I earnestly recommend the same policy here. The resources of the enemy are so great in machinery and manufactures that no addition the Confederacy can make will increase their power to do us harm or to do harm to others; and any unnecessary or object less destruction of private property, or even public, ought to be avoided. I see no adequate result in the case from the destruction of this establishment. The unfinished work must be left to future adjustment, and will be covered by advances made heretofore-$500,000 from War and Navy, and $150,000 from Nitre and Minig Bureau, I learn.

J. GORGAS,

Chief of Ordnance.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST ARMY CORPS,

March 7, 1865.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding:

GENERAL: I received a letter yesterday from a friend in the interior of North Carolina assuring me that there are large quantities of provisions in the State; that many have two and three years' supply on hand; and that gold will bring anything that we need to our armies. The gold is in the country, and most of it is lying idle. Let us take it at once, and [use[it to save Richmond and end the war. If we hold Richmond and save our cotton, the war cannot last more than a year longer. If we give up Richmond we shall never be recognized by foreign powers until the Government of the United States sees fit to recognize us. If we hold Richmond and let the enemy have our cotton, it seems to me that we shall furnish him the means to carry on the war against us. It looks to me as though the enemy had found that our policy of destroying the cotton rather than let it fall into their hands would break them down, and that it has forced them to the policy of sending on there to make a contract to feed and clothe our armies, in order that they may get the means of carrying on the war of subjugation. If we will keep our cotton and use our gold our work will be comparatively easy.

I remain, respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST ARMY CORPS,

March 7, 1865.

General R. E. LEE, Richmond:

General Gary is ordered to send out a scouting party up left bank of James. General Fitz Lee can ascertain movements of enemy on this side of the river by putting one or two good scouts on this side, and should shape his movements accordingly. If enemy's cavalry comes down on this bank General Lee will be needed here. If General Lomax knows that the enemy is divided he will know better how to meet any column that may move against him. Is there anything further about the force at Fredericksburg?

J. LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General.