War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 1282 N. AND SE. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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hope, therefore, that General Pickett's division may be held in readiness to move to this side of the river at any moment. I think that we can check any advance that the enemy may make, if we get that division together, with our cavalry and the local troops that we might get out from Richmond. I think that our better plan will be to wait here from the enemy, as we are not able to get our troops to any distant point in sufficient numbers and in proper condition to warrant an effort no intercept the enemy upon his march. If, however, the enemy should be making for Lynchburg, the case will be different.

I remain, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

J. LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST ARMY CORPS,

March 5, 1865.

General PICKETT,

Commanding, &c.:

Have no information of any increase of force in our front.

O. LATROBE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,

March 5, 1865.

Major R. P. DUNCAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: I have nothing special to report to-day. One man wounded in Ransom's brigade and four desertions from the same to the enemy.

Very respectfully, yours,

B. R. JOHNSTON,

Major-General.

HOUSE OF DELEGATES,

March 6, 1865.

Honorable J. C. BRECKINRIDGE,

Secretary of War:

SIR: Inclosed you will find a letter addressed to me complaining of the outrageous conduct of some men of Colonel Mosby's command now in the Northern Neck. The letter is from a justice of the peace for one of the counties I represent, and I can vouch for his respectability and veracity. I will add, further, that this is but a single instance of the numberless outrages committed by some of these rogues, clothed in the uniform of confederate soldiers, which are being brought to my attention by every letter I receive from home. These men are reflecting discredit and disgrace upon their honorable and honest comrades. I trust it will be the pleasure of the authorities to inquire into these outrages, and see that the perpetrators are properly dealt with. I would address Colonel Mosby on the subject, but do not know where l letter would reach him. Your attention to this matter is earnestly invited.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ELIAS EDMONDS.