War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 1280 N. AND SE. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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HEADQUARTERS,

Charlottesville, Va., March 3, 1865.

Lieutenant Cochran will proceed to Brown's Gap and ascertain if there [are] any movements of the enemy in that direction. He will direct all soldiers to this place, and will learn, if possible, of General Early's whereabouts. He will report promptly and fully to me at this place.*

G. C. WHARTON,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST ARMY CORPS,

March 4, 1865.

Major General C. W. FIELD,

Commanding Division:

Lieutenant-General Longstreet wishes you to complete the main line of abatis from the left of Bratton's old position to the Williamsburg road. If you cannot find the necessary material elsewhere you can remove and use one of the lines of abatis in front of the pond, where it is so essential.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. LATROBE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,

March 4, 1865.

Major R. P. DUNCAN:

MAJOR: I have nothing unusual to report to-day. One desertion from Wise's and one from Elliott's brigade to the enemy.

Very respectfully, yours,

B. R. JOHNSON,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS BRAXTON'S BATTALION ARTILLERY,

March 4, 1865.

Major General W. N. PENDLETON,

Chief of Artillery, Army of Northern Virginia:

GENERAL: Upon my return to camp Major Moorman informed me that you wished me to relieve Colonel Poague as soon as the light guns from Richmond were received to replace his with,and that you would order one of Cutshaw's companies over to assist in manning this new line. By a note from Colonel Poague, received yesterday, I am informed that eight guns (with the necessary ammunition) are at Chester, and that he is ready to be relieved. I wrote him in reply that I not act until I heard from you in regard to giving me more men. If it meets with your approbation I propose sending Major Moorman to take immediate charge of this line of Poague's, by which a field officer will be always present at either end of the line under my command. My quartermaster has failed to make any arrangements for procuring forage nor do I know where we shall draw from. Our horses are suffering; in fact, some of them have had nothing to eat for several days. Could Major

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*This paper was captured by Sheridan's troops.

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