War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 1199 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

February 4, 1865.

Hon SECRETARY OF WAR,

Richmond:

SIR: I have the honor to report the facts of a recent handsome affair in the Valley, as stated by General Early:

A party of the enemy, about eighty strong, under the command of a major, surprised our cavalry picket at Edenburg and captured a lieutenant and fourteen men. Captain Grandstaff, upon learning this fact, immediately pursued, with twenty men of the Twelfth Virginia Cavalry, and overtook the enemy at Woodstock. He attacked and routed the party, recaptured our men and their officer, and took 16 of the enemy, with 20 horses. Lieutenant Mohler, of the Twelfth Cavalry, accompanied Captain Grandstaff, and acted with great gallantry. This affair reflects credit upon the officers and men engaged.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Petersburg, February 4, 1865.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: I received your telegram of the 1st instant announcing my confirmation by the Senate as general-in-chief of the Armies of the Confederate States. I am indebted alone to the kindness of His Excellency the President for my nomination to this high and arduous office, and wish I had the ability to fill it to advantage. As I have received no instructions as to my duties, I do not know what the desires me to undertake.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

February 4, 1865.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the letter of the Honorable A. T. Caperton with reference to the cavalry brigade lately commanded by Brigadier-General Johnson. In reply, I beg leave to state that after the return of the cavalry expedition under General McCausland into Pennsylvania, and the subsequent disaster it met with at Moorefield, the necessity of some measure to improve the efficiency of the troops composing it was manifest, and I directed General Early to do what the necessity of the case and interests of the service required. I gave him some general suggestions as to the expediency or reorganizing the several commands, and it was in consequence of these facts that the brigade in question was broken up, General Early thinking he could thereby make the best arrangement. All the regiments composing the brigade, except the Eighth and Fourt-