War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 1146 N. AND SE. VA., N. C., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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[Sub-inclosure Numbers 1.]

HEADQUARTERS FINEGAN'S BRIGADE, January 21, 1865.

Brigadier-General FINEGAN,

Commanding Division:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report the following desertions from this brigade on the night of the 20th, while on tour of picket duty: Ninth Florida: Private Jas. H. Stephens, Company E; Private John Cannon, Company F; Private George H. Kayle, Company H. Tenth Florida; Private E. G. Berry, Company F; Private S. D. Kirkland, Company D. I herewith submit the report of the officer commanding the picket detail.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. LANG,

Colonel, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS MAHONE'S DIVISON, January 21, 1865.

Respectfully forwarded.

JOSEPH FINEGAN,

Brigadier-General.

[Sub-inclosure Numbers 2.]

HEADQUARTERS FINEGAN'S BRIGADE, January 21, 1865.

Brigadier General JOSEPH FINEGAN,

Commanding Division:

GENERAL: In pursuance of instructions contained in note of this date from corps headquarters, I would respectfully report that I have investigated the cases of the desertions reported form the picket-line of the 18th and 19th instant, and have the honor ot report that eleven of the twenty-two so reported deserted from camps and not from the picket-line. Of the eleven who deserted form the picket-line three deserted on the night of the 17th instant, and were at the time sentinels on post. Captain Dozier, of the Ninth Regiment, who was chief of the picket-line, and Lieutenant Brown, of the Eighth, who commanded that part of the line from which the sentinels deserted, both agree in their statements that said desertions were not the result of negligence upon the part of either officers or men upon the line. Both these officers had just completed a tour of inspection at the time the desertions occurred. All three of the men were discovered in the act of deserting, and were fired upon by the men upon the line near them, but they succeeded in running the gauntlet and reached the enemy in safety.

Upon the following night Captain Floyd, of the Eleventh Regiment, being upon picket, discovered what he supposed suspicious movements on the part of two men occupying the same pit (with four others), but not discovering anything so flagrant in their conduct as to warrant their arrest he resolved to have them closely watched; accordingly, he imparted his suspicions to Lieutenant Tolbert, of the Second Regiment, who was in charge of that part of the line, and selecting two men, whom they supposed to be of undoubted loyalty, informed them of their suspi-

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*See Simmons to Simmons (inclosure Numbers 2.), p. 1144.

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