War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 1139 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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SUGAR LOAF, January 25, 1865.

General BRAGG:

I will go over to-morrow, if possible. If not, will send my inspector. I have been unable to get about much on account of a carbuncle on my face.

R. F. HOKE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Wilmington, January 25, 1865.

Brigadier General L. HEBERT,

Commanding, &c., Fort Anderson:

GENERAL: It is reported to the commanding general that large numbers of negroes have run from plantations north of your position, and have made or are making their way to the enemy's lines. As the roads are few by which they can travel, it is hoped you may be able to intercept and captured them. You should picket the roads, and then keep your cavalry moving in small bodies. owners should be advised to send their able-bodied men within our lines.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

ARCHER ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

FORT ANDERSON, January 25, 1865-8 a. m.

Colonel ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

All quiet. No change reported up to this time. I will again send an officer out to-day toward Battery Lamb to make observations. The weather is clear.

LOUIS HEBERT,

Brigadier-General.

FORT ANDERSON, January 25, 1865-7 p. m.

Colonel ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

The fleet still lies about same position, and consists of thirteen gunboats, the flag-ship, one single-turreted monitor, two blockaders, and three schooners, all inside. Outside are seven schooners and four steamers. There have been no movements on Confederate Point. I have no information from Smithville, and all is thus far quiet.

LOUIS HEBERT,

Brigadier-General.

WILMINGTON, January 25, 1865.

Brigadier General L. S. BAKER,

Weldon:

Advise me fully as to enemy's movements and strength. Where does he come from?

BRAXTON BRAGG.