War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 1120 N. AND SE. VA., N. C., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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WILMINGTON, January 21, 1865.

Major General R. F. HOKE.

Sugar Loaf:

General Bragg desires you use every effort to find out whether enemy's infantry or any part has sailed or made any movement.

ARCHER ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SUGAR LOAF, January 21, 1865.

Colonel ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

An increase of the ration is respectfully asked and extremely advisable. Answer.

R. F. HOKE,

Major-General.

FORT ANDERSON, January 21, 1865-8 a. m.

Colonel ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

All remains quiet, and, as far as can be seen, the enemy's fleet remains unchange. The weather, however, is rainy and misty, and we make observations with difficulty. I neglected to report last night that two vessels, apparently captured blockade-runners, had been brought up to the fleet. We judged so from the fact that one had a Confederate flag, another an English flag, with the U. S. flag flying over them.

LOUIS HEBERT,

Brigadier-General.

FORT ANDERSON, January 21, 1865-10 a. m.

Captain ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

It is now so foggy that nothing of the fleet can be observed form this point.

LOUIS HEBERT,

Brigadier-General.

ANDERSON, January 21, 1865-2 p. m.

Colonel ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Weather calm; very foggy and damp. Nothing can be observed from this point. All remains quiet to this hour.

LOUIS HEBERT,

Brigadier-General.

WILMINGTON, January 21, 1865.

Brigadier General LOUIS HEBERT,

Fort Anderson:

General Bragg desires you to instruct pickets and send patrols to prevent the negroes escaping the enemy.

ARCHER ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.