War of the Rebellion: Serial 096 Page 1115 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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SUGER LOAF, January 20, 1865.

Colonel ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

The enemy retired to their entrenched camp last night. All quiet this morning.

R. F. HOKE,

Major-General.

SUGAR LOAF, January 20, 1865.

Colonel ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: The enemy retired to their entrenched camp last night. Two deserters came in this morning, but gave very little information. The enemy have received no re-enforcement except artillery. They state that the move was only a reconnoiter. I do not think they will make an advance until Sherman's movements are more fully developed. Terry is to co-operate with Sherman, and may do so by a movement against the Wilmington and Manchester road from Smithville. If the governor would collect a force for the protection of Wilmington we would be able then to move against Terry.

Respectfully, yours,

R. F. HOKE,

Major-General.

SUGAR LOAF, January 20, 1865-10 a. m.

Colonel ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Two more deserters have come in. Their statements all agree no re-enforcement have arrived, but have sent after. All of their iron-clads and monitors have gone to Charleston. A magazine exploded in Fort Fisher and killed and buried 400 of their men. I heard the explosion. They are very much afraid of torpedoes. We should fill the river with them.

R. F. HOKE,

Major-General.

SUGAR LOAF, January 20, 1865-6.45 a. m.

Colonel ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Things are still quiet up to this time. I expect, however, that the fleet will move up to-day. I most respectfully desire to say that if they choose to steam by I have not the means to stop them. In that event I would like to have some directions as to my afar course.

LOUIS HEBERT,

Brigadier-General.